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My Story

 

Nitsa Rona graduated with distinction from the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design. The connection between the body and soul, which she invoked in her final project jewel that brings the wearer to self-awareness, still captivates her as a artist theme to this day.

 At the end of her studies, Rona won the Sharet Foundation Scholarship and the most beautiful jewelry award for 1987 named after Eitan Ron.

 "The metalwork makes it possible to get a quick product," says Rona. "You can take a dirty, scratched metal strip and within an hour turn it into a smooth, sparkling ring."

 This aspect of the discipline, and the need for the inherent contribution from her childhood home, led her to change course and offer jewelry to emotionally needy and underserved populations.

 She began this benevolence by teaching jewelry-making at a club for the elderly in the the Tel Aviv Ezra neighborhood.  Later, she established a workshop as a rehabilitative, therapeutic, educational framework for at-risk youth. As a safe, pleasant tree-lined place where one could drink, eat, speak, express and create, the workshop quickly became a second home for these teens.

 Years later, Rona returned to the studio and her personal work. Having not lost her love of mentoring, here she began to teach jewelry design to anyone thirst for listening and discovering the artist within themselves.

 "Jewelry is a wonderful profession, it has alchemy, and there is a dialogue between idea and material. There is a meditative aspect to it. And, there is also an instinctive aspect to it," said Rona.

 In her studio in Ramat Hasharon, Nitsa Rona listens. She listens when she designs for a special order, and when she teaches, tutors and instructs one-on-one, or in small, intimate groups. This is because every piece of jewelry is born from a story, each person has their tale. Each story has its unique incarnation in the material through annealing, stretching, crushing or rolling. Metal or wood is loaded with meaning, hope, faith, and passion. They come to life as an artistic object; a treasure trove of memories and emotions.

 Some clients come with a gemstone they received as a gift, some want to use old gold jewelry as the raw material, and some start from clear slate. In any case, with the attention, meticulous observation, patience and wisdom of the hands, every piece of jewelry is perfectly matched to the body structure for whom it was created, their personalities, their loves and their preferences.

 The studio is fully equipped, as a result of Rona's wide and varied range of work, from the basic and raw, to the high-end platinum jewelry set, which meet the strictest standards of industrial jewelry. A massive 1950's carpentry table, years old, lovingly receives the blows of the hammer during the dance. There are tweezers, brushes, bricks and other soldering materials on the soldering table, and a professional Brenner with focused and precise blades. This solid, dependable table served as her desk during her studies in the 1980's, and traveled with her from Romema to Mount Scopus then Tel Aviv. It has been reliable it in making her art and she has been just faithful to it through the years.

 Traditional work tools, calipers that measure angles of curves and an old English wooden vice with decorative brass elements, live in harmony with innovative instruments such as ultrasonic and magnetic staples. Precious metals - silver, gold, platinum accompany wood, leather, rubber and rarely - plastic. Exotic raw materials also grace her carpentry table, such as old and broken wood pieces from her father's travels in Africa as well as thin, sturdy steel wires from Switzerland. Basic and complex. Artistic freedom and technological control. Distant and foreign. Near and familiar. Here in Nitsa Rona's studio, everything is connected.

The Studio

 

In her studio in Ramat Hasharon, Nitsa Rona listens. She listens when she designs for a special order, and when she teaches, tutors and instructs one-on-one, or in small, intimate groups. This is because every piece of jewelry is born from a story, each person has their tale. Each story has its unique incarnation in the material through annealing, stretching, crushing or rolling. Metal or wood is loaded with meaning, hope, faith, and passion. They come to life as an artistic object; a treasure trove of memories and emotions.

Some clients come with a gemstone they received as a gift, some want to use old gold jewelry as the raw material, and some start from clear slate. In any case, with the attention, meticulous observation, patience and wisdom of the hands, every piece of jewelry is perfectly matched to the body structure for whom it was created, their personalities, their loves and their preferences. 

The studio is fully equipped, as a result of Rona's wide and varied range of work, from the basic and raw, to the high-end platinum jewelry set, which meet the strictest standards of industrial jewelry. A massive 1950s carpentry table, years old, lovingly receives the blows of the hammer during the dance. There are tweezers, brushes, bricks and other soldering materials on the soldering table, and a professional Brenner with focused and precise blades. This solid, dependable table served as her desk during her studies in the 1980s, and traveled with her from Romema to Mount Scopus then Tel Aviv. It has been reliable it in making her art and she has been just faithful to it through the years.

Traditional work tools, calipers that measure angles of curves and an old English wooden vice with decorative brass elements, live in harmony with innovative instruments such as ultrasonic and magnetic staples. Precious metals - silver, gold, platinum accompany wood, leather, rubber and rarely - plastic. Exotic raw materials also grace her carpentry table, such as old and broken wood pieces from her father's travels in Africa as well as thin, sturdy steel wires from Switzerland. Basic and complex. Artistic freedom and technological control. Distant and foreign. Near and familiar. Here in Nitsa Rona's studio, everything is connected.